Deal or no deal

British Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal was shot down today. We’ll kick off our show with the latest and what’s next. Then, speaking of “no deal”: Under the partial government shutdown, some Trump advisers are seeing what a smaller government really looks like. Plus, why your Netflix is getting more expensive.

Unknown unknowns

As of this weekend, we’re in unprecedented territory. It’s the longest partial government shutdown in history. We’ll spend some time on today’s show looking at how the effects of the shutdown could snowball over the coming days. Then:?More than 30,000 are on strike today after negotiations fell out between the teachers union and Los Angeles Unified School District. A look at the economics behind America’s second-largest school district. Plus: Why taxes this year may be an even bigger headache than usual.

Does this happen in other countries?

While the American government shutdown turns into the longest ever,?a crucial vote on Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal heads to Parliament next week, which could determine the fate of Britain’s future with the European Union. We’ll bring you the latest. Then: Why Amazon is making a new streaming service, and how red carpet advertising works.

How’d retailers do this holiday season?

Going into the holidays, consumer confidence was high and retail forecasts were looking rosy. Now, more than a week into the new year, it turns out the results are a bit of a mixed bag. We take a closer look at industry news out today. Then, government employees are feeling a lot of stress after 20 days of the partial government shutdown. How is that affecting their jobs? Also: A group of big finance companies is starting a new stock exchange, Members Exchange.

All the business that’s not happening

With today’s talks falling through and federal workers about to miss a paycheck, this shutdown is on its way to becoming the longest-ever, and millions in missing income has ripple effects. We’re devoting much of today’s show to that, looking at how housing, food, taxes and more are impacted. Plus: Experts weigh in on trade negotiations between China and the U.S.

What it means to miss a paycheck

Friday’s payday — or it should be. If the government shutdown continues through the week, federal workers will miss out. We talked with some out-of-work employees about how the shutdown is affecting their personal economies. Then: High economic growth in the U.S. has fueled carbon dioxide emissions despite technological advances aimed to reduce them. Plus: Why are airline tickets priced like that anyway?

You can’t manage what you can’t measure

With the government shutdown in its third week, the U.S. Census Bureau is still closed, leaving businesses and investors without valuable economic data. We’ll look at what they’re missing and talk with a hog farmer about how he’s affected by the impasse in Washington. Plus: What does a trip to the emergency room really cost?

It’s been a weird week

Among the federal employees still working during the government shutdown are those at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. They put out this morning’s jobs report, and it’s better than anyone expected: 312,000 new jobs. We’ll talk about what that does (and doesn’t) tell us about the economy and recap a very volatile week for markets. Plus, is it just us or are movie credits getting longer?

Would you let a resort lock your phone away?

We can feel it all the way from China. Apple’s revised forecast yesterday helped torpedo stocks today. But this might just be a leading indicator of the problems a lot of companies will have as the second-biggest economy in the world slows down. We look at what’s next for Apple and?how American businesses are dealing with the slowdown.?Also on the show: Professional sports teams are scoring more and more points each game. How is that helping the bottom line??Then: Be honest, are you guilty of going on vacation and staying glued to your phone? You’re not alone, but some businesses want to change that.?We’ll talk about why a growing number of hotels are trying to persuade vacationers to take a break from their smartphones.?

Kai visits the dark web

When a company like Target or Yahoo gets hacked, where does the stolen personal information end up? A lot of times, it is up for sale on the dark web. Cybersecurity researcher Stephen Cobb gives?Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal a tour of the dark web and shows us how stolen information is sold. Also on the show: China’s slowdown.?A new survey reveals that Chinese manufacturing declined in 2018. We’ll talk about what’s behind the decline, what Chinese officials may do in response and how that is affecting American companies. And is Brexit still happening? Maybe.?British Prime Minister Theresa May has until Jan. 14 to convince Parliament to approve her plan or face the possibility of a “no-deal” Brexit. What would that look like?