What do you do when your old boss runs for president?

We’ve got big tech drama at home and abroad topping today’s show: We’ll get you caught up on the new charges against Huawei and an alarming iPhone bug. Plus, the latest on Brexit. Then: Former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz might be running for president in 2020, but can the brand insulate itself from politics?

How to reopen the government

The government shutdown may be over, for now, but agencies that gather economic data could take a while to get caught up. We’ll look at the effects and talk with Congressional Budget Office Director?Keith Hall. Plus, the state of the iPhone in China and a conversation with “Wonder Woman” and “I Am the Night” director Patty Jenkins.?

What the shutdown cost

As President Donald Trump agreed to temporarily reopen the government Friday, mayors from all around the country were wrapping up a trip to Washington, D.C., to talk about what the shutdown has cost their communities. We’ll talk to some today, plus what government data we’ve been missing during the standoff. Then: What it’s like to be a female economist.

Modern monetary theory is a sink

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?said recently that modern monetary theory, or MMT, should “be a larger part of our conversation” when it comes to funding ambitious policies she’s proposed. On today’s show, we’ll explain how it works — it’s kind of like a kitchen sink. But first, we’ll take you inside the financial lives of?furloughed federal government workers. Plus, more key moments in Trumponomics.?

10 million percent inflation

That’s where the situation is heading in Venezuela. We’ll tell you what you need to know as President?Nicolás Maduro?is called to resign. Then, more from our series on President Trump’s signature economic moments. Plus, why the government shutdown is hitting harder than what GDP lets on.?

Trumponomics

In the past two years, President Trump has changed the way we talk about business and economic life in this country. He views the economy through a transactional lens: there are always deals to be made or renegotiated.?He’s the CEO of America, Inc., relying largely on his instincts and owning successes and stock market records.?We’ve identified 10 moments that illuminate how the president thinks and what’s changed, and we’ll roll them out all week. Also on today’s show: businesses with discounts for federal workers, how China’s mobile payments business passed its GDP, and pass-throughs explained.

Day 1 at Davos

Things weren’t looking exactly glass half-full today at the World Economic Forum, the annual meeting of economists, bankers and world leaders. During a news conference, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said the global economy was growing “more slowly than expected.” We break down what that means in a larger context. Today also marks the 31st day of the partial government shutdown and no end appears to be in sight. Some furloughed workers, in trying to keep up with finances, are becoming the targets of scams. Then, we talk tech and whether or not 5G is here, or if it’s all just marketing. Also: what exactly it takes to be a park ranger.

The Fed’s view on the shutdown

During periods of economic uncertainty, many people look to what central bankers say as a forecast of what’s to come. In that spirit, we have Federal Reserve Gov. Lael Brainard on the show today to talk about the longest government shutdown in history. Then, why AT&T is pulling its ads from YouTube. Plus, as always, your recap of the week’s news from our analysts.

Cardi B speaks the truth

The rap superstar took to Instagram yesterday to make sure her followers were paying attention to the government shutdown: “this s**t is really f**king serious, bro.” She’s right! We’ll start the show by looking at the newly “essential” employees President Donald Trump sent back to work, and whether other federal workers might file for unemployment. Then: The USDA is trying to bring Big Dairy back to school lunches. Plus, about that 10-Year Challenge.

Regulate me!

With no end in sight to the partial government shutdown, some businesses are starting to miss the regulation that shielded them from risk. Then: The fallout from yesterday’s failed Brexit vote may not be isolated to Britain. We’ll look at how uncertainty could ripple through the global economy. Plus: partially autonomous car features have the potential to save lives, but using them improperly could cause more accidents.