The street-level view of Brexit

It’s our second day of special Brexit coverage in London, and today we’re talking with entrepreneurs and American expats just trying to get by here, living and working at the heart of Brexit negotiations but feeling very far from resolution.

The most pro-Brexit city in the U.K.

It’s been 1,007 days since the U.K. voted to leave the European Union. That’s nearly three years of political paralysis and economic uncertainty. For the rest of this week, we’re coming to you from London. The first in our series of special reports from around Britain comes from the town of Boston, about three hours outside London, which had the highest proportion of votes in favor of leaving the EU in 2016. Plus, we take more of your Brexit questions.

The view of Brexit from outside Parliament

Kai Ryssdal’s in London this week, reporting on the slow plod of Brexit and how it’s affecting people, businesses and the economy. Today he was out in front of the Parliament building. But first:?The Trump administration is taking the Affordable Care Act to court … what happens if it wins? Plus, the history of anti-drug public service announcements and why McDonald’s bought an artificial intelligence company.

Can Apple’s streaming service really think different?

Apple already makes so many of the devices we use to stream TV and movies. Now the tech giant is trying to make some TV of its own. We kick off today’s show talking about what Apple brings to the streaming wars. Then:?Some farmers are struggling to pay back government loans, thanks to trade wars and low prices for key crops. Plus, a preview of our Brexit coverage from London.

Bonus: The Uncertain Hour season 3 premiere

Our documentary podcast The Uncertain Hour is going inside America’s drug war this season. We’re starting with the?strange and little-known story of how, 30 years ago, George H.W. Bush came to hold up an baggie of crack in his first televised speech in the Oval Office — a baggie he said was seized in front of the White House. Later, we’ll explore how the policies Bush launched reverberate through today’s opioid crisis, trying to answer the question: How does an epidemic end? Subscribe to The Uncertain Hour here or wherever you get your podcasts so you don’t miss a thing.

The legacy of the war on drugs

We’re in the middle of one of the deadliest drug epidemics in history, with nearly 50,000 people dying from opioid overdoses in the United States in 2017. On this season of our podcast The Uncertain Hour, we look at how these kinds of crises end. Today, we’ll play you a bit from the first episode, all about an Oval Office address from George H.W. Bush that turbocharged the war on drugs. Plus, the latest home sales numbers and the struggle to fight extremism online.

Smart cars are getting smarter

Volvo is planning to introduce tech that monitors the health and wakefulness of drivers. But do the benefits outweigh the privacy costs? Plus, China’s tight video game regulations and what you can expect this season on our podcast The Uncertain Hour.

Political fundraising’s new math

Fundraising is a huge part of running for president, but in this primary season, where candidates receive their money may be as important as how much they make. Plus: Fallout from Facebook’s job discrimination settlement and the “femtech” apps that help women control their health — while collecting a lot of personal data.

The end of recycling as we know it

For years, most of the plastic bottles, aluminum cans and other recyclables Americans put by the curb ended up in China, which used those raw materials in its factories. But the country stopped buying foreign trash last year, and that’s putting municipal recycling programs into a panic. Plus: We take apart the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ 2019 economic report and wonder if Instagram’s in-app purchases could threaten Amazon.